Category Archives: South Africa

88 reported unprovoked shark attacks and five fatalities worldwide; UF reports 2017 as “average year”; One attack in England…

Continue reading 88 reported unprovoked shark attacks and five fatalities worldwide; UF reports 2017 as “average year”; One attack in England…

LEADING southern hemisphere retail group commits to one-by-one caught tuna; First African retail Member to the IPNLF network

Continue reading LEADING southern hemisphere retail group commits to one-by-one caught tuna; First African retail Member to the IPNLF network

How ethical, transparent & environmentally-conscious are the world’s ‘Top 100’ seafood firms? Latest ‘Top 100’ benchmarking report is out

How well do the world’s ‘Top 100’ Seafood companies (in US$ sales turnover terms) address the “Seafood Ethics and Sustainability Challenge”?

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At last!… After a year of oft-tedious work analysing tens of thousands of pages of annual, integrated & sustainability reports, financial statements, policy documents & countless web pages, etc. the second edition of the only benchmark of the world’s top seafood corporations’ Sustainability Reporting / Transparency has now been completed & is out!

The ‘Seafood Intelligence Benchmarking Report of the Top 100 Seafood Firm’s Sustainability Reporting & Transparency [in English]’ – The ‘Top 100 2016’ – is out!

The report – a hefty 1,580 pages (vs. ‘only’ 1,117 pages for the tentative 2015 edition) – comes in three volumes containing several hundreds of data-rich tables, matrices & comparative tables. It follows on the footsteps of the similar yearly (since 2011) benchmarking exercise which focuses on the world’s Salmon Farming Industry and which has now become an industry reference.

This year sees the Top 5% ranked in the “Excellent!” Transparency category ([Corporate, Social and Environmental Reporting rating] CSERr > 70/100); 5 firms vs. 4 in 2015: +1); 11% in the “Very Good” Transparency category (CSERr [50-70[); 21% in the “Can do Better” Transparency category (CSERr [30-50/100[); 49% in the “Poor to Very poor!” Transparency Category (CSER [0.01-30[); and 14% in the “Absolutely Nil” Transparency Category (CSER = 0.00)… Overall, a lot of work needs doing if the seafood industry is to live up to consumers’ expectations when it comes to seafood sustainability and ‘ethics’.

Did you know – among many other figures – that 79% of the Top 100 seafood firms did not communicate on the [human] fatalities ‘registered’ (or not) in their operations in 2015-2016; and that fishing is one of the most dangerous jobs on the planet? A similar comment could be made when it comes to many ethical and human rights issues, at a time when those concerns are catching the attention of the media and retailers… More than ‘simply’ having economic and environmental footprints, the seafood products which end up in our plates can and do have social (including on ethnic minorities in some of the world’s remote areas, which oft-“coincide” with fisheries and aquaculture activities) and human impacts… What are those footprints? Those assessments start with monitoring and reporting data…

Among many other things, the Seafood Intelligence Benchmarking Report provides a valuable source of information re. the disclosures and non-disclosures from the various seafood / fisheries / aquaculture corporations and industry organisations. The long-term aim being to assess the level of transparency displayed by the global seafood industry, as we firmly believe that the industry (including all ‘keystone’ actor)’s sustainability, its social license to operate, and the transparency it displays are intrinsically linked…

The ‘Top 100’ 2016 report which features 35 Asian firms (25 of which headquartered in Japan), 20 North American firms (17 from the USA), 17 from the EU, 11 from Norway, 6 from South America, etc… is the second edition of an annual comparative benchmark of the global seafood industry’s transparency; rating them against a set of 135 key performance indicators (KPIs) linked to ‘sustainability reporting’ in the seafood realm, thus constituting a ‘transparency audit’ of sorts for each company. Assessments and comparisons are made by sector [Aquaculture; Wild Catch Fisheries; Fish Feed/Meal/oil; Seafood Processing/Trade], country of headquarter, continents/regions, type of company (stock listed: 51/100; Private: 48; Government-owned: 1); type of reporting (GRI-G4 indexed-reporting, Annual/Integrated), Main species Tuna / Salmon, etc…

Overall, 16 companies (i.e. 16%…) stand out for a ‘very good’ to ‘excellent’ transparency record (which can and should nonetheless be improved upon); led by [11/16] firms in the ‘aquaculture’ [particularly salmon farming/feed] category. [Only] 16 companies (not always the same…) are reporting annually according to the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G4 guidelines.

Considering that a quarter (25) of the world’s largest firms are Japan-headquartered, it is troubling [notably for Japanese stakeholders] that the country is the one performing ‘least well’ in terms of transparency. Norway is the country represented by 3 or more firms which averages the best transparency record (almost ‘very good’ in average), with the global ranking nonetheless headed by a Japanese-owned salmon Norwegian company [Cermaq, to be specific, is #1 of the Top 100]. Also worthy of attention — or perhaps ‘troubling’ for those with high transparency expectations in the US/North American seafood market — is the fact that only 1 out of 20 [5%] of the Top 100 North American seafood firms (17 in USA, 3 Canadian) has a ‘very good’ sustainability reporting record; with all other [95%] N. American firms considerably lacking (at various degrees) transparency… It would be unfair to single out North America (not so if one has higher expectations there) as transparency is globally sorely lacking for well over half of the world’s largest firms. It is the latter firms however which provide much of the world’s retailers’ seafood…

transparency-per-country-table-launch-article-07-02-2017-pic

As another illustration of the many uses which can be made of the data contained in the report, Seafood Intelligence can draw its yearly ‘Red List’ of some of the important topics least reported/discussed-upon by the world’s ‘Top 100 Seafood’ firms; i.e. those [very important] topics on which the seafood industry is least transparent (scroll down, below).

In all: 67,500 individual ratings (675 per company) were carried out one-by-one, following a thorough assessment of all available material made public online via their corporate websites by the world’s Top 100 seafood firms up-until October 31, 2016.

A holistic approach — and the compiling, tracing and disclosing seafood supply chain data [for example re. Österblom et al (2015)] — can also be credited for the coming-together of some of the world’s largest / ‘keystone’ seafood players in the December 2016-launched initiative called “Seafood Business Ocean Stewardship” — a.k.a. the “Keystone Dialogues” — which aims to “clear-out IUU fisheries, inhumane working conditions and overall “change the international fishing industry.” This is a welcome initiative which we will follow with great interest in months and years to come. Four of the eight major companies taking part in the Keystone Dialogues (i.e. half) also play a pivotal role in the Global Salmon Initiative (GSI)… All 8 firms taking part in the “Keystone Dialogues” are of course featured in this ‘Top 100’ benchmark.

Wouldn’t it also be great to see those 8 ‘Keystone’ firms display a standard for transparency in the seafood supply chain (also a – public – warrant of ‘traceability’ and ‘good ethical behaviour’), backed – say – by an annual (then quarterly if not dashboard-styled ‘live’) publication of ‘keystone dialogues participants’ sustainability report…? The ‘keystone’ status of those firms and their respective positions in the global seafood chain could certainly help the uptake of such transparency standard in the wider seafood industry… No doubt a win-win not only for human rights, seafood sustainability, ocean governance; but also in terms of the social-licence-to-operate it would grant a transparent and sustainable industry, and with it: economic sustainability (never mind ‘food security’) rewards…

The 2nd edition of the ‘Top 100’ report’s methodology has been fully revised [there were a few glitches in the tentative report’s methodology] and also makes the parallel with GRI G4-based corporate sustainability reporting indicators and the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as well as alluding to various leading seafood sustainability eco-certification standards & criteria.

Among many others, we asked ourselves 35 key questions – relating to some of the 135 key performance indicators monitored. The (+/- perceived) non-compliance and/or non-communication re. some of those indicators contributes significantly to many negative headlines (some which are chronically impacting on imports/exports of specific seafood product/species; costing hundreds of millions of $$$ in lost incomes and – allegedly sometimes – leading to loss of thousands of jobs). Below are the discussions / non-discussions over those selected topics – called simplistically ‘disclosures’ for sake of argument, in the table below. NB: refer to the full report re. the actual ‘quality’ of those disclosures per firm…

One of the many issues which also historically focused our attention was ‘How do the seafood firms communicate on the role and representativeness of women (in their Board of Directors, Top Management etc.)?’ What are the policies in place to tackle the lack/inferiority of women’s presence in the C-suite and decision-making circles?… etc…

  • Would you be surprised to learn that 76% of the Top 100 seafood firms fail to communicate on the role and participation of women; and that 60% do not disclose the representativeness of women in top management?
  • Would you be surprised to learn that 22% have 0% women in Board AND 0% in Top Management?… and that 68% of fims have a 100%-male Board membership; and 47.5% have 100%-male Top Management team [and 0% have a 100% female Top Management]?
  • Would you be surprised to learn that 95.1% of the Top 100 firms have 50% – or more – men on Board of Directors?… And that only 4.9% of firms have 50% – or more – women on Board of Directors?

Shouldn’t another question be: “Is it fair?!”… If and when there are women, should they be ‘relegated’ to solely Marketing, Communication and/or HR (Guess how many women CEOs there are in the seafood industry Top 100…)… And in some countries: “Does the Board women representation follow the guidelines imposed by stock exchange regulations”…?

The transparency data compiled can be analysed in a multiplicity of ways, for example, following is the RED LIST [2016] of least-disclosure seafood sustainability topics by the world’s ‘Top 100’:

red-list-top-100-2016-feb-7-2017-2

This, and much, MUCH, more in the 1580-page Seafood Intelligence 2016 ‘Top 100’ benchmarking report.

Beyond being full of useful comparative information & content for seafood retailers and industry stakeholders in general, the Top 100 benchmarking report can also help firm’s CSR/Sustainability policies & communication in the seafood business (see the Testimonials to see how some of the firms have communicated in the past year; and how they have discussed their rankings in annual report / media & press releases: http://www.seafoodintell.com/?page_id=18). Industry leaders, C-suite executives in private & stock-listed companies, large NGOs & Eco-Certification bodies, Institutions, Foundations and International Retailers, among others, have purchased the reports.

Article by Bertrand Charron, SeafoodIntelligence.com editor & author of the ‘Seafood Intelligence 2016 Benchmarking Report of the World’s Top 100 Seafood Firm’s Sustainability Reporting & Transparency’ published February 7, 2017.

PS: Contact [editor – at – seafoodintelligence.com] if you would like to order a copy (1,750 euros [+VAT @ 20% in the EU]; 1580p/3 Pdf volumes).

More information here: http://www.seafoodintell.com/?page_id=8261 or here: http://www.seafoodintell.com/?page_id=16

NB:  This work is not funded by any entity, government, agency, foundation/NGO, industry or others. Seafood Intelligence relies solely on the proceeds of the reports’ sale to carry out this research & work; so please pass the word to anybody whom you feel may be interested.

PS, February 8, 2017; See also the press release issued by Cermaq Group: https://www.cermaq.com/wps/wcm/connect/cermaq/news/mynewsdesk-press-release-1793122/mynewsdesk-press-release-1793122

cermaq-rank-1-in-top-100-2016-cermaq-pr2

AIMS… Seafood Intelligence hopes that…

  • This report will help seafood companies aspiring to a higher level of sustainability reporting to compare – by topics & specific indicators – & benchmark their performances (where noted) and transparency with that of their competitors and leaders in the field…
  • The ‘Top 100’ benchmarking report is designed to help key seafood industry players, retailers, environmental organisations and all stakeholders interested in assessing the level of proactive/voluntary transparency & communication endeavours displayed by top seafood firms worldwide when it comes to corporate, social and environmental sustainability reporting.
  • This report identifies Top 100 seafood firms’ major lacks in transparency, and specifically highlights and comments many of the issues left wanting from a third party and objective viewpoint.
  • This benchmarking report will help seafood firms devise their first Sustainability Report (and consider GRI-G4 reporting) and gain precious time by learning from the best reporting practices in the industry; and provide them with many useful tips & much information.
  • This benchmarking report will provide thoughts to aquaculture firms aiming for ASC certification with a benchmark & check list of sort re. disclosures and topics to be addressed.
  • This report provides stakeholders, retailers / buyers, analysts & investors with a snapshot of the 2015 & 2016 (statements & disclosures monitored up to October-November 2016) seafood industry trends and available data. It provides context-setting information regarding the global seafood market and some of the challenges it faces.
  • This report provides seafood industry organizations, authorities and eNGOs with an overview of the current status of the global seafood “sustainability” debate; and gives them an insight into key industry decision-makers’ positions and expectations. It will also help them map-out areas of ethical risks re. the salmon industry.
  • The Seafood Intelligence ‘Top 100’ benchmarking report provides all stakeholders with ‘[sea]food for thoughts’ over the current Sustainability status of the industry, over how various players report / fail to report; and will help firms & industry organizations and officials also assess how others are dealing with the sustainability challenges they are facing and how they communicate about it.

‘FIRST multinational quantification of relative sentiments & opinions of public around distinct forms of aquaculture’; Using thousands of newspaper headlines

Continue reading ‘FIRST multinational quantification of relative sentiments & opinions of public around distinct forms of aquaculture’; Using thousands of newspaper headlines

Oceana Group delighted with 69% full-year profit growth; “Aquaculture would be an important point of diversification” – CEO

Continue reading Oceana Group delighted with 69% full-year profit growth; “Aquaculture would be an important point of diversification” – CEO

“SUSTAINABILITY influences actions” – MSC independent survey: “Seafood consumers put sustainability before price and brand”

Continue reading “SUSTAINABILITY influences actions” – MSC independent survey: “Seafood consumers put sustainability before price and brand”

MSC’s latest survey reveals levels of consumer trust in seafood labelling; 55% of consumers in 21 countries doubt…

Continue reading MSC’s latest survey reveals levels of consumer trust in seafood labelling; 55% of consumers in 21 countries doubt…

2016’s new Pew Marine Conservation Fellows will investigate (among others) “possibility of closing the high seas to fishing”

Continue reading 2016’s new Pew Marine Conservation Fellows will investigate (among others) “possibility of closing the high seas to fishing”

STATISTICS on fisheries in OECD member countries just published: ‘OECD Review of Fisheries: Country Statistics 2015’

Continue reading STATISTICS on fisheries in OECD member countries just published: ‘OECD Review of Fisheries: Country Statistics 2015’

“EU should allow insects as protein source” – NEW International Platform of Insects for Food and Feed launched

Continue reading “EU should allow insects as protein source” – NEW International Platform of Insects for Food and Feed launched

SETBACK & progresses: Sino-Norwegian ‘Aquapolis’ land-based salmon & other Sp. “6,000 fish farms” projects in China; Malaysia, South Africa also investigated

Continue reading SETBACK & progresses: Sino-Norwegian ‘Aquapolis’ land-based salmon & other Sp. “6,000 fish farms” projects in China; Malaysia, South Africa also investigated

CORRUPTION in South African government circles contributes to overfishing; Chinese (& others) bribe of law enforcement “quite common”

Continue reading CORRUPTION in South African government circles contributes to overfishing; Chinese (& others) bribe of law enforcement “quite common”

SOUTH AFRICA “keen to develop its aquaculture sector”; interest in development of RAS systems for high-value species

Continue reading SOUTH AFRICA “keen to develop its aquaculture sector”; interest in development of RAS systems for high-value species

OIL & Gas (port/hub) development in South Africa could impact shellfish aquaculture industry

Continue reading OIL & Gas (port/hub) development in South Africa could impact shellfish aquaculture industry

TROPICAL herbivorous fish moving into temperate waters as a result of climate change

Continue reading TROPICAL herbivorous fish moving into temperate waters as a result of climate change

LANDLOCKED Lesotho provides “ideal, pristine environmental conditions for the farming of large trout”; Exports to Japan

Continue reading LANDLOCKED Lesotho provides “ideal, pristine environmental conditions for the farming of large trout”; Exports to Japan

Woolworths commits to sourcing ASC (‘or equivalent) certified farmed seafood & salmon; Responsibly sourced & traceable

The leading South African retailer, Woolworths, has pledged to source all their farmed seafood from sustainable and responsible operations by 2020.  By the end of 2015, all of Woolworths’ farmed products will be sourced from aquaculture operations that are: engaged in a credible, time-bound improvement project* or, where applicable WWF-SASSI green-listed, or formally committed to achieving the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) certification or have other credible standards in place. Then, by the end of 2020, all aquaculture species sold will be: from aquaculture operations that are engaged in a credible, time-bound Improvement Project*, or WWF-SASSI green-listed, or where applicable, ASC (or equivalent) certified. Continue reading Woolworths commits to sourcing ASC (‘or equivalent) certified farmed seafood & salmon; Responsibly sourced & traceable

FISHERIES leaders from Comoros, Mauritius, Madagascar, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, the Seychelles, South Africa & Tanzania share their MSC experience

MSC

Fisheries leaders from across government, NGOs and industry have gathered this week in Cape Town, South Africa to discuss solutions to over fishing. The meeting marks the first time that the Marine Stewardship Council’s (MSC) international Stakeholder Council has met in Africa and coincides with World Food Day 2014 (October 16, 2014). “There are no quick wins or easy fixes to the problem of unsustainable fishing, but creating consumer demand for sustainable seafood has an important role to play,” commented MSC CEO Rupert Howes. “Evidence shows that MSC certified fisheries deliver measurable benefits by keeping fish stocks at healthy levels whilst giving fisheries access to new markets where sustainable seafood is in increasing demand. I hope that today’s meeting is the beginning of new real and lasting improvements in the way that African oceans are fished.”

Continue reading FISHERIES leaders from Comoros, Mauritius, Madagascar, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, the Seychelles, South Africa & Tanzania share their MSC experience